Learn How To Read Basic Body Language And Facial Expressions

Learn How To Read Basic Body Language And Facial Expressions

Basic Body Language – You can’t fake body language  Body language is a form of non verbal communication which consists of body postures; gestures; facial expressions and eye movements. The body tells the truth when the mouth is lying. Most people are unaware of body language signals and there impact.   People form up to 90% of their opinion about you in the first 4 minutes, and for the most part, the impact you will make is non-verbal.  Have you ever said that you have a ‘hunch’ or ‘gut feeling’ that someone has just told a lie, or that something just does not feel right? In this instance, someone’s body language and their spoken words don’t marry up. The body language component can be divided roughly into three parts: The things you can do nothing about:  gender, race, age, height etc The things you can do something about: with effort you can change your dress sense, hair style, your general appearance etc The things that you already have, and choose to use: gestures, eye contact etc Basic Body Language And Facial Expressions Eye contact The way we make eye contact is one of the most important aspects of how we communicate. Do not constantly look around as if you are uncomfortable or not interested. Men tend to rub one eye vigorously or look away if they are telling a fib, whilst women will use small, gentle touching motions just below the eye, usually to avoid smudging their make-up. Posture Your posture can have a significant impact on how you feel and therefore present yourself – next time you notice that you are feeling...
Should I Ask Questions In a Job Interview?

Should I Ask Questions In a Job Interview?

You’ve made it to the interview and you’ve prepared for all the questions they are supposedly going to ask you, such as “Why should I hire you?” and “What is your greatest weakness?“. You go in confident, chest up, and smiling for what feels like forever. They start asking you questions about your background and life stories to illustrate your unique character. You dabble in to your past work experiences, and personal events that define your leadership skills and qualities that make you a perfect fit for the position. The interview is almost over and then they ask you the last question that you forgot about – Do you have any questions for me? This is your window of opportunity that you really do not want to miss. Participating in the interview is one factor, but what distinguishes candidates from one another is the way they actively participate with the interviewee by asking them questions. Not only does this demonstrate your sincere interest in the position, it also illustrates that you’ve done your homework on the company and the position offered. As nervous as you are, asking questions can also show a sign of maturity and confidence. Qualities that all employers seek. It does no matter whether you are applying for an office job, to take on work at home roles or to assist another WAHM in their business, try to prepare at least one question. So when the opportunity arises how will you respond?  On the flip side, if it is not offered, how can you in fact introduce it into the conversation. Remember every interview is a...
Interview Question: What Is Your Greatest Weakness?

Interview Question: What Is Your Greatest Weakness?

Job interviews can be very stressful for the majority of people.  Not preparing for them can exacerbate your emotions.   There are a few classic questions that tend to come up in interviews, one being a question relating to your weaknesses. Often it will be asked in conjunction with a ‘What is your greatest strength?” question, whilst other times on its own. So how do you answer this question? What is your greatest weakness? Everyone has weaknesses.  There is no denying that. Whilst the greatest weakness interview question could be considered harsh, and one designed to throw you off, it is asked to see how much insight you have of your own shortcomings and exactly how much you are willing to share with the interviewer. Here are a 3 ways you can tackle this interview question: 1. A weakness you are working on You may like to discuss this in relation to a shortcoming that you are very aware of and one that you are already working on addressing. It might be time management, for example.  You have learned not to take on too much work as the quality of your output cannot be guaranteed. You have now taken a course in time management, you use a to-do list as well as a calendar and things are improving. By showing the employer that you have this insight and that you have taken action to overcome it, you demonstrate that you know about your issues and you are working on them. Time management is something everyone can relate to so you won’t run the risk of being ruled out. 2. Turn...
Do You Have a Personal User Manual?

Do You Have a Personal User Manual?

People are way more complicated than machines.  Machines have user manuals.  It is about time that we start helping our colleagues understand how we work.  Do we need personal user manuals? Do you have a personal user manual? Creating a personal user manual requires a great deal of self-awareness as well as diplomacy in how you frame your challenges in a vulnerable but strong voice. Think about a personal user manual as a guide that you can share with others, whether it be friends, family or colleagues, that will not only help them to understand how you ‘work’ but help them to help you.  And if those you associate with also undertake this exercise it could be an ice-breaker to help knock down the unknowns and help to get communications flowing in a more positive and productive manner. If you are interested to have a go, here is a five-step process which is worth following: Step One: First Thing That Comes to Mind With a pen and a piece of paper, try to answer these next series of questions, noting the very first thing that comes to mind.  Try not to think about it too long and hard, or write very detailed responses.  Dot points are also a good idea. What is your style? For example: What motivates you? Do you like to gather lots of information and process it before making decisions or do you jump on the first idea that you get? Do you like to share concepts or work alone?  When do you like to be approached and how? Do you like to be left alone to...
Interview Question: Why Should I Hire You?

Interview Question: Why Should I Hire You?

The “Why should I hire you?” question in a job interview is considered to be one of the hardest to answer because it is typically your last chance to showcase what makes you a good candidate. The secret to success, however, is simple. If you want to get it right, you need to list off everything you will do to contribute to the company. Instead of listing your past accomplishments that might suggest you are a perfect fit at the company, which is the obvious way to answer, try to focus on what you will do at the company that would make it a better place. They need to hear why they need you and not why you need them. For example: Tell them how you can, and will, contribute to department and company. Let the interviewer know that one of your goals is to make their job easier by taking on as much responsibility as possible and that you will be excited about this job starting on day one. In preparation for such a question, some find it hard to know what types of contributions to include in your answer.  Consider taking a look at the job description and select a few key details and concentrate on how you will make improvements. If you feel like you have already thoroughly described your skills and accomplishments and consider answering this question could see you repeating yourself, another way to answer the question can be to take a less-formal approach. For example: Mention you play an instrument, good for company get-togethers. Maybe you make an awesome cup of coffee. Great...
How Long Should A Resume Be?

How Long Should A Resume Be?

Resumes can be prepared in all shapes, sizes, formats and fonts.  But which method is considered the most appropriate, and more importantly just how long should a resume be? The key to a successful resume is its content; more precisely, concise content that is straight to the point and tailored to the job you are applying for. You would have probably heard about the “one-page resume”.  Whilst every industry, hiring manager, recruiter and employer will require different information, often in varying amounts,  there is a common consensus that a short, sharp one page resume is all that the recipient has the time to read.  If there are multiple applications for one job, it can be a very time consuming task to read through pages and pages of someone’s life, education and work history. Resumes are typically scanned in a matter of 10-20 seconds.  This timeframe is critical to determine if the applicant appears to meet the requirements.  A resume needs to grab the employer’s attention, answer their questions and do so in the shortest amount of time possible. You may have the experience of 5 jobs under your belt, or just one.  You may have 3 qualifications to your name or just one. The key is to hone in on only those suited to the role you are applying for. Don’t forget to: Keep it short, sharp and to the point. Tailor it to the job you are applying for. Try to keep it to one page. Keep the font and layout on par with your cover letter. Provide a summary of qualifications with keywords and phrases. Check and recheck your spelling...

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